Greater Manchester's local society lottery funds health good causes

17 November 2011

Five projects in Greater Manchester have been awarded local society lottery funding from the People’s Health Trust, the independent charity responsible for deciding where the health good causes money is most needed and spent

Communities across England, Scotland and Wales are starting to benefit from the £50 million a year from the good causes money raised by local society lotteries through The Health Lottery

Through the Healthy Places Healthy People grants programme, the People’s Health Trust – the independent charity responsible for deciding where the good causes money raised by local lottery societies is spent – is funding activity to reduce isolation amongst older people, provide support for informal carers, particularly young adult carers, and support local projects that help create healthier environments and communities.

Five projects in Greater Manchester have been awarded local society lottery funding from the People’s Health Trust, the independent charity responsible for deciding where the health good causes money is most needed and spent.

  • Funding of £40,000 for the Alzheimer’s Society to recruit a Dementia Support Worker to provide a life-changing service to people with dementia, their carers and their families, helping them to maintain their independence, improve their sense of well-being and take control of their lives.
  • Funding of £31,030 has been awarded for a new Mencap Gateway Active Centre to be set up to run an award scheme designed to improve the health and wellbeing of people with a learning disability, supporting them to develop new skills and live a more enriched and active life.
  • Funding of £46,801 has been awarded to the Princess Royal Trust for Carers to support adults and young carers who live in Salford. Services include respite, a sitting service, one-to-one emotional support, information and advice, support for people caring for someone with mental health problems, a free Helpline, support groups and activities for young carers.
  • Funding of £44,069 has been awarded to the School Food Trust to work with young people aged 14-19 and their families, and young people with special educational needs to set up their own community-based healthy cooking club, working with up to 1,000 people in the area over the next year.
  • Funding of £40,579 has been awarded to the Youth Sport Trust to support their Healthy Lifestyle Coaches programme, working with primary schools in some of the most deprived areas of Great Britain, designed to support and enhance their Change 4 Life programme, funded by the Department of Health.

Professor Jennie Popay, Chair  of the People’s Health Trust, said: “Our funding comes from local society lotteries and it’s really important for us to show people in the communities these lotteries represent how their money is being spent to tackle the social causes of ill-health and promote well being. Our funding will provide an injection of new money into the charitable sector to support local activity at a time when it is really needed.  And by working with well-established partners and local groups we know that we're investing in the people and neighbourhoods that can benefit the most from this funding.”

Paul Moran, Team Manager for Young Carers’ Services at Salford Carers’ Centre, said: “We’re very excited to receive this funding and are looking forward to developing our Young Adult Carers project over 2012. The funding will allow us to offer support to young carers as they make the transition to being young adult carers. We are also hoping to look at how we can reach out to young adult carers within ethnic minority communities in the city and raise awareness of the kinds of support that are available.”

Angus Nelson of the Alzheimer’s Society said: “We’re delighted to receive funding towards a one-to-one service, like a Dementia Support Worker in Greater Manchester.  Services like this give a person living with dementia, their carers and their families, information and guidance to help them live independently, feel in control of their lives and have an improved sense of well-being.”

Rob Rees, Chairman of the School Food Trust said: “Inspiring people to learn to cook is a fun and simple way to help them live more healthily. More than half of the people already taking part in our existing cooking clubs at thousands of locations all over the country say they eat a better diet as a result, so we know this works. This grant is a wonderful opportunity to help even more people reap the benefits of being able to make a decent meal from scratch, and we can’t wait to get started on setting up our new clubs and cooking activities.”  

You have already completed an application for funding, are you sure you would like to submit another application? You should only submit another application if it is for a different project. If you want to amend an application that has already been submitted, please call us on 020 7749 9100.

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